what’s a life like with you in it?

Would I feel whole again? Would I be fearlessly me?

I have hardened my image over my adolescence and took really long to soften this heart again. Even now, I hold bits of reluctance to let go and perceive it as drive, channelling all that I feel towards the work that I do while consciously seeking purpose and value. I wish I didn’t need to do it alone. I wish I didn’t want to look this hard for purpose. That I inherently understood my worth. You would have been so good at letting me understand my worth because you showed me how it was like to love in person, where she couldn’t.

That I inherently understood my worth to this beautiful world and what I am capable of.

You would have been so good at letting me understand my worth because you showed me how it was like to love in person, where she couldn’t. She was not built, but you taught her. And you taught me. Then you messed up and hurt the very people you showed how to love.

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Get this.

“The thing that will turn their hearts is to get them to see what you saw. Your gift to this world is your story, your perception. And that is a gift that nobody in this world can give, because nobody else has your lenses.”

Power

Power Causes Brain Damage.

“Subjects under the influence of power, he found in studies spanning two decades, acted as if they had suffered a traumatic brain injury—becoming more impulsive, less risk-aware, and, crucially, less adept at seeing things from other people’s point of view. Sukhvinder Obhi, a neuroscientist at McMaster University, in Ontario, recently described something similar. Unlike Keltner, who studies behaviors, Obhi studies brains. And when he put the heads of the powerful and the not-so-powerful under a transcranial-magnetic-stimulation machine, he found that power, in fact, impairs a specific neural process, “mirroring,” that may be a cornerstone of empathy. Which gives a neurological basis to what Keltner has termed the “power paradox”: Once we have power, we lose some of the capacities we needed to gain it in the first place.

Powerful people “stop simulating the experience of others,” Keltner says, which leads to what he calls an “empathy deficit.” This is a depressing finding. Knowledge is supposed to be power. But what good is knowing that power deprives you of knowledge?

I asked Owen, who admits to a healthy predisposition to hubris himself, whether anything helps keep him tethered to reality, something that other truly powerful figures might emulate. He shared a few strategies: thinking back on hubris-dispelling episodes from his past; watching documentaries about ordinary people; making a habit of reading constituents’ letters.”

Been in close contact with related content recently, especially with my performance management exam held on Wells Fargo and my upcoming financial accounting theory focus on earnings management. This left me wondering if there really is more to the acts we see and what exactly goes on in these heads when they made the choices and whether they had their “persons”/”toe holders” to keep them grounded as other individuals did to anchor themselves from these tides of glory.

What and how much does it take for individuals to see past themselves in their acts of service and remain grounded in the course? mm.

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“Voice” by Clara Tang

On World Literature

china-dragonThis is the second in a series of student work dedicated to interrogating creatively the concept of diaspora.

Here, Clara interrogates the relationship between language and cultural identity. The frustration and anger of the poetic voice is palpable.


“Voice”
by Clara Tang (4 November, 2016)

I.

I speak
and the soil covering this cultural home of mine
growls and spits
once the soles
of my English-laced feet
kiss its Chinese ground.

The aftermath: questions
that build on themselves like grocery lists.
Lists that become a spine of metaphors
but are all metaphoric for the same thing:

“Are you Chinese?”

When I speak, and my tongue roars
the language of the Western lion
but whispers
the language of the dragon,
I’m Chinese.

When I taste
the dragon’s fire beneath the tip of my tongue,
and the flames are ice in comparison to everyone else’s dragons,
I’m Chinese.

When the moon pushes…

View original post 497 more words

On Learning

The Learning Generation, identify with this so, so much.

“I mean, how can we claim to be sure of anything in this current world we live in. The diversity alone is incredible and our notion of teachers cannot simply remain as the professor who has written 6 award winning papers throughout his career. In complexity, learning simply cannot be held in the linearity of a single person, no matter how brilliant. Not anymore.

…And they touched me by reminding me; they said “you have always taught us that the foundation of any education or learning is trust”. Trust gives permission for a group to enter questioning that is uncomfortable. Trust allows the teacher to contend with his or her own ignorance. Trust deals with the fear we experience when we enter learning that we highly resist. And it is true, if indeed we are going to pursue new ways of learning, of listening, of embodying the perspectives and motivations of others, then for both teacher and learner it must begin with the engendering of trust. How else are we going to expect ourselves to gain a full education of how to navigate the complexities of today’s human species?

…homogenous organization just do not possess the diversity and flexibility to adapt to current day disruptions. It is the company that learns to harness the full potential and mitigate the inefficiencies of diversity that is going to succeed in the long run. The entity that only favours the intellectually smart, or only listens to the views of the elite will die its own death. For since when in the ecological state of nature has in-breeding ever thrived?

For now, I dare declare that I am an excellent teacher because I am an excellent learner. And I think that is where we must begin. ”

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too close.

so this just happened.

Worse still, it’s a suburb I have visited and love so very much – Brighton 😦

It’s too close and I cannot imagine this unfolding if it’s before my eyes. Avoiding and unseeing isn’t a thing. Seeing and consciously not doing anything isn’t a thing either. I don’t really understand this need for chaos. I try to understand and see but I still don’t get it.

Wishing so much peace and love for this beautiful world right now.

Butterfly effect needs to stop.

#whereisthelove

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